Last edited by Vudozil
Monday, May 4, 2020 | History

2 edition of Lucan"s Bellum civile found in the catalog.

Lucan"s Bellum civile

Nicola Hömke

Lucan"s Bellum civile

between epic tradition and aesthetic innovation

by Nicola Hömke

  • 259 Want to read
  • 29 Currently reading

Published by De Gruyter in Berlin, New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Latin Epic poetry,
  • Civil war in literature,
  • History and criticism,
  • Influence,
  • Literature and the war,
  • History

  • Edition Notes

    Statementedited by Nicola Hömke and Christiane Reitz
    SeriesBeiträge zur Altertumskunde -- Bd. 282, Beiträge zur Altertumskunde -- Bd. 282.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsPA6480 .L777 2010, PA3 .B45 v.282
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxii, 240 p. ;
    Number of Pages240
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL25280001M
    ISBN 103110229471
    ISBN 109783110229479
    LC Control Number2010549388
    OCLC/WorldCa618330316

      Lucan's "Bellum Civile": Between Epic Tradition and Aesthetic Innovation - Ebook written by Nicola Hömke, Christiane Reitz. Read this book using Google Play Books app on your PC, android, iOS devices. Download for offline reading, highlight, bookmark or take notes while you read Lucan's "Bellum Civile": Between Epic Tradition and Aesthetic Innovation.   Recent work on the reception of the Bellum Civile has brought out Lucan's importance for early modern English poets confronting the effects of civil war in national or cosmic histories. Lucan's relation to Virgil is transgressive in terms of size and scale and also of theme and ideology. Whatever further voices the Aeneid may contain, its main plot is of a providential teleology, the story of Cited by: 3.

    Masters devotes an entire chapter to this hypothesis in his book Poetry and Civil War in Lucan's Bellum Civile (), arguing that by being open-ended and ambiguous, the poem's conclusion avoids "any kind of resolution, but [still] preserves the unconventional premises of its subject-matter: evil without alternative, contradiction without compromise, civil war without end.".   In this edition Professor Fantham offers the first full-scale commentary on the neglected second book of Lucan's epic poem on the war between Caesar and Pompey: De bello civili. Book II presents all three leading figures - Cato, Caesar and Pompey - in speech and action/5(K).

    Lucan's Bellum Civile is one of the most impressive and unusual works of Silver Age Latin literature, and has been the subject of much research in recent years. In this volume well-known experts on Lucan examine the poetological, narratological and stylistic techniques the author employed to write on the theme of civil war.   CUP () p/b pp £ (ISBN ) This ‘Green and Yellow’ commentary by R. on Pharsalia vii—the battle of Pharsalus—is welcome, not least because the poet has been receiving less than generous attention from scholars over the past fifty and more years. Since R. does not (directly) do so, it may be helpful to summarise .


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Lucan"s Bellum civile by Nicola Hömke Download PDF EPUB FB2

Lucan´s Bellum Civile is one of the most impressive and unusual works of Silver Age Latin literature, and has been the subject of much research in recent years.

In this volume well-known experts on Lucan examine the poetological, narratological and stylistic techniques the author employed to write on the theme of civil war.5/5(1). This edition is of Book I of Lucan's epic poem, De Bello Civili, sometimes also known as the Pharsalia, a great work of the Silver Age of Latin literature.

Book I summarises the background to the civil war between Caesar and Pompey and takes the narrative as far as Caesar's crossing of the Rubicon and the outbreak of panic in the city Lucans Bellum civile book Rome, including many signs and by: 1.

This book is a major literary reevaluation of Lucan's epic poem, the Bellum Civile ("The Civil War"). Its main purpose is to bring out the implications of one basic premise: this poem is not only about civil war, but uses the metaphor of civil war (i.e.

self-destruction and internal discord) as the basis for the way it tells its : Jamie Masters. In Gewalt und Unmaking in Lucans Bellum Civile Hans-Peter Nill offers a theoretical approach to essential narrative representations of violence in Lucan’s civil war epic, combining theories and.

Book description In this edition Professor Fantham offers the first full-scale commentary on the neglected second book of Lucan's epic poem on the war between Caesar and Pompey: De bello civili. Book II presents all three leading figures - Cato, Caesar and Pompey - in speech and by:   In Gewalt und Unmaking in Lucans Bellum Civile Hans-Peter Nill offers a theoretical approach to essential narrative representations of violence in Lucan’s civil war epic, combining theories and methods of narratology, reception aesthetics, and by: 1.

Lucan's epic poem on the civil war between Caesar and Pompey, unfinished at the time of his death, stands beside the poems of Virgil and Ovid in the first rank of Latin epic. This newly annotated, free verse translation conveys the full force of Lucan's writing and his grimly realistic view of the subject/5.

By 65 he was composing the tenth book but then became involved in the unsuccessful plot of Piso against Nero and, aged only twenty-six, by order took his own life. Quintilian called Lucan a poet "full of fire and energy and a master of brilliant phrases." His epic.

ANNAEVS LVCANVS (39 – 65 A.D.) DE BELLO CIVILI SIVE PHARSALIA. Liber I: Liber II: Liber III: Liber IV: Liber V: Liber VI: Liber VII: Liber VIII: Liber IX.

Book I The Civil War begins Book II Pompey in retreat Book III Conflict in the Mediterranean Book IV Victory for Caesar in Spain Book V Caesar the dictator in Illyria Book VI Thessaly: Erichtho the witch Book VII Pharsalia: 'a whole world died' Book VIII The death of Pompey Book IX Cato in Libya Book X Caesar in Egypt: Cleopatra.

Book I Caesar’s crossing of the Rubicon Now, Caesar, swiftly surmounting the frozen Alps, had set his mind on vast rebellion and future conflict. On reaching the banks of the Rubicon’s narrow flow that general saw a vision of his motherland in distress, her sorrowful face showing clear in nocturnal darkness.

Paolo Asso, Ph.D. () in Classics, Princeton University, is Assistant Professor of Classical Studies at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. He has recently published an edition, with. Book I Lucan the Civil War Book I. Of war I sing, war worse than civil, 1 waged over the plains of Emathia, 2 and of legality conferred on crime; I tell how an imperial people turned their victorious right hands against their own vitals; how kindred fought against kindred; how, when the compact of tyranny 3 was shattered, all the forces of the shaken world contended to make mankind guilty; how.

The Bellum Civile, Lucan's poetic narrative of the monumental civil war between Julius Caesar and Pompey Magnus, explores the violent foundations of the Roman principate and the Julio-Claudian dynasty. The poem, composed more than a century later during the reign of Nero, thus recalls the past while being very much a product of its time.

Lucan's Latin epic, the Civil War (also known as the Pharsalia), must stand as a contender for the weirdest and craziest epic poem of all time. Waggish David Auerbach on literature, tech, film, etc. Audio Books & Poetry Community Audio Computers, Technology and Science Music, Arts & Culture News & Public Affairs Non-English Audio Spirituality & Religion.

Librivox Free Audiobook. Is All About Math (Video Podcast) Full text of "Lucan: the civil war books I-X (Pharsalia)".

Lucan’s “Pharsalia” or “Bellum Civile” -- which means “Civil War” -- describes the bloody war between Julius Caesar and Pompey the Great.

This epic poem is broken up into 10 books, though more were. Lucan, Roman poet and republican patriot whose historical epic, the Bellum civile, better known as the Pharsalia because of its vivid account of that battle, is remarkable as the single major Latin epic poem that eschewed the intervention of the gods.

Lucan was the nephew of the. FROM BABYLON TO AMERICA, THE PROPHECY MOVIE by School for Prophets - Attila Kakarott - Duration: New Haven SDA Temple - Brooklyn, NY Recommended for you. The Adaptation of Apostrophe in Lucan's Bellum Civile. This is a full-scale edition (the first in nearly 70 years) of the first book of Lucan's De Bello Civili, an important and influential epic poem written in the 60s AD, which recounts the civil war between Julius Caesar and Pompey in the years BC.

The volume includes an introduction, text with apparatus criticus, and commentary.Poetry and civil war in Lucan's 'Bellum Civile' is a book founded on a genuine admiration for Lucan's unique, perverse and spellbinding masterpiece." "Above all, argues Dr.

Masters, the poem is obsessed with civil war, not only as the subject of the story it tells, but .Introduction Back to Top of Page “Pharsalia”  (also kown as  “De Bello Civili”  or  “On the Civil War”) is an epic poem in ten books by the Roman poet  Lucan, left unfinished on the poets’ death in 65 s: